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and mississippi. notice toward the mid-atlantic, the moisture and chance for showers, nothing like the south. either way, the clouds are moving in. heavy rain toward texas. still raining in the southeast. we are talking about the combination bringing eight inches of rain that have been soaked. >> the rain is really stuck there in the southeast. >> this unbelievable amount of rain. this summer, we have seen way over, 10 to 15 inches over. >> how many inches of rain have they seen? >> every place is different but some ten to 15. >> thank you. >>> kind of good news/bad news. it's a deal for the believers convinced we are not alone on the universe. do you believe this? >> yeah. >> the cia is officially acknowledging the existence of super secret area 51. the documents include a map of the location in the nevada desert. would you go, berman? >> mm-hmm. >> you would? >> mm-hmm. >> they said it's a testing sight for surveillance during the cold war. >> you believe that? >> i do. >> if they are not doing the alien autopsies there, where are they doing them? they are doing them somewhere? >> yeah. i'
battered much of the southeast is again present flash floods and record rainfall. gulfport, mississippi got hit the worst receiving roughly 6 in. of rain. the rising rotor's covered roads, stalled cars and stranded drivers. the airport reportedly received more than 4.5 in. of rain in one hour. the heaviest rain has moved out and more showers are in the forecast. well for that reason for central idaho is now blocking more than 100,000 a.. lightning ignited the beaver creek fire almost two weeks ago. weather has helped firefighters but by last night it was only 5 percent contained. 2200 homes had been evacuated >> prison authorities examining information relating to the death of princess diana and her boyfriend. scotland yard is not saying what the information is, only that officers are assessing the relevance and credibility. the telegraph reports detectives were looking into claims princess diana was murdered by a member of the british military. the couple was killed and a high-speed crash in paris 16 years ago well, what he was chasing them. prince william set down for his first off
teenager on vacation in mississippi. is it is a new day, but the day isn't over. the struggle for the civil rights for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago closed the books on the last century. well, when the book closes on the 21st centu
of the mississippi river, but the southeast is getting too much rain. lhat will mean higher food bills, and here's manuel bojorquz. >> can rained again in cordell, georgia, they call themselves the water capital of the world. dell,renshaw has grown them here for 30 years. >> it's the wettest year i've seen. >> reporter: rainfall totals in many parts of the southeast are nchenches above normal. produce that grows close to the neound or on vines have been heavily damaged. waterlogged melons here, split open, rot or lose flavor. law you can tell? >> you see is that brown around the edge of it? that water just running off? >> reporter: half of crenshaw's crop is ruined. se thinks he's facing $1 million n losses. in a drought, you can irrigate. >> right. ut weporter: but when you have this much rain what, can you do? >> there's nothing you can do. you can't take the water away. >> reporter: the melons that aren't any good end up at packing houses like the ones thed by danny wilcher. july is supposed to be peak season. r. we shut down for two weeks. >> reporter: and that hasn't happened in how long? >
oxford, mississippi, they had the violence down there to keep black students out. george wallace stood in the schoolhouse door. king was a march for jobs and freedom but that didn't produce the civil rights accident. what produced it, john, was the death of john f. kennedy a couple months later when he was assassinated and linden johnson's presidency and building on that movement to pass the civil rights act, and then selma produced the voting rights act. but let me say this john. there was a downside in that decade, too. snick was no longer led by john lewis but h rap brown and stokley carmichael. you had the riots in watts in '65. dr. king was shot, a hundred cities burned, including washington, d.c. i was in nixon's campaign. the whole issue was law and order in america, and at one point nixon and wallace together had almost 70% of the national vote. >> eleanor. >> well, that was quite a trip through history, thank you. but nixon and wallace together culminate in the southern strategy where you take political exploitation of the plight, if you will, of blacks in the south, and when
that these were phoneo scandals like the mississippi river they keep rolling and keeps getting bigger. i think the republicans are doing well. i think they are very methodical and are not hysterical. they are pursuing it and it will take time but they are pulling on it a thread at a time. >> what about that? if it starts expanding beyond the irs that starts to become more of a problem for the administration. >> they are not supposed to share information but the threat would be that they are sharing information for political purposes to undermine conservatives. in this situation that is not clear. they shared it with the enforcement division of the federal elections commission. so there could be a legitimate reason to see if somebody has tax exempt status to see what they are requesting and then requesting similar status from irs. we don't know. but the idea is and i think that there was testimony from lerner that there had been no sharing of data whatsoever. so now we have an exception to the rule apparently and of course that compounds all the suspicious about lerner and the fact that she has
in the united states, and not alabama or mississippi. we're talking about new york city, madison avenue. >> have you experienced it in new york? >> not as much because new york is sort of my city, and i tend to go places where i'm expected. i think in someways, i've started to do that because i don't want to have these kinds of experiences. >> so you're almost avoiding it? >> exactly. i have been, you know, passed up by a taxi driver. i've also had a taxi driver yell something foul at me -- >> both of us. >> i have been. i might be more -- >> just because i'm annoying. >> where as i've had some foul "n" word yelled at me on a new york city street. >> have you really? >> absolutely in the middle of the street. >> they aren't talking to me. it's not what they call you, it's what you answer to. i know what i am and i won't allow anybody to put me in a box. >> has it gotten better since the first black president of the united states or not? >> yeah, it's not so much that it's gotten better. i think it's become more of a conversation, and, you know, the race conversation is one that black america has
like mississippi, alabama, tennessee, will for every dollar that their citizens put into the federal coffers, those states w we have $1.20, $1.40 back on their investments. states in the north get 91 cents back on every dollar their citizens pay. new yorkers get in the line of 68 cents to 70 cents back. this is to generally sub subside programs like medicare that the south claim they hate but gobble up disproportionately. >> here we find ourselves rolling our eyes at the latest anti abortion bill or anti voting allow. paula deen among georgia republicans has better approval ratings than dr. martin luther king. do we take a poll like this seriously? >> yes. >> what do you think it means? >> specifically for paula deen, she kind of represents this pinnacle of what a lot of contemporary southerners want to feel is the new south, which is somebody who brings all the old school genteel manners and refinement and all this sort of stuff and brings with it a comp temporary viewpoint makes it so that they don't to have apologize for that, you know, slave day flag that they love to wave around
't rainfall amounts in the mid atlantic and parts of the lower mississippi valley and even to the plains. that includes oklahoma city. that cold front is going to bring a nice change out there. the cold air is dipping in from the north. that means temperatures for some parts are going to run-about 10 degrees below average. you will say, is ill really still august? temperatures in the 70s. yes. that's what we're expect, tuesday, wednesday, once that front passes, typically temperatures in throw 80s an parts of the south as well. >> it's good for the kids. the kids won't feel so bad about starting school now. >> yes, they will. i feel bad for them. >> come on! be excited about school, kids. >>> in the meantime if you look up in certain parts, you will see a meteor shower, tell us about that. >> these are images from last year. we're talking the peak viewing is tonight as well as tomorrow. these are the images and you're looking at the meteors and the debris. once that starts to hit the atmosphere, that's when you start to see it trailing and burning up. when they hit the earth they move at
in the mississippi river. the missouri supreme court will now decide his fate. walmart has agreed to approve -- improve safety conditions as part of a settlement with federal health and safety regulators. federal inspectors have uncovered what they termed repeat and serious violations at a store in rochester, new york. under the deal, walmart will improve procedures relating to trash compactors and the handling of chemicals and hire an outside monitor to ensure compliance at store locations in 28 states. walmart will also pay $190,000, tiny fraction of its profits which amounted to 17 billion dollars last year. in a statement, the worker group our walmart, which has lisa only -- which has recently led a number of historic strikes, said last month workers at a california warehouse that moose products for walmart launched a two-day strike to protest alleged retaliation after reporting safety issues that included blocked emergency exits, nonfunctioning forklift brakes and a lack of sufficient ventilation, and water under intense heat. japan's prime minister has ordered government action to help
can't get fresh salmon. >> mississippi number two, alabama number three. >> bad accents. >> we're the craziest state. >> california tops the list. >> craziest state and you adopt even mention florida? come on. that doesn't make sense at all. >> i've lived in florida and florida has all the of the weirdest news stories. don't certain websites have pages just devoted to florida weird news. >> u.s. news, foreign news, sports, florida. >> colorado also has a lot of weird news. >> fun to talk about. everyone has their own opinion. >>> a sad scene, hundreds of dolphins mysteriously dying along the east coast. why is this happening and what does it have to do with humans? >> and is today the day the -- >> boy band. >> i shouldn't read this. what do i know. it's 'n sync, are they getting together? brand-new evidence your favorite boy band and needless to say mine is making a comeback. >> nervous, tucker is reading this one. he does have all their albums. we're new to town.ells. welcome to monroe. so you can move more effortlessly... we want to open a new account: checking and savings.
anybody. instead they're sending those same people to help the economy of georgia and mississippi and elsewhere. and so we have seen in alabama alone the real effects of not having comprehensive immigration reform. >> representative terri sewell, thank you so much for joining us this afternoon, ma'am. >> thanks. >> coming up, more on the presidential news conference as we shift our focus to the war on terror. stay with us. good job! still running in the morning? yeah. getting your vegetables every day? when i can. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. two full servings of vegetables for only 50 delicious calories. yeah? then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. silence. are you in good hands? plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's health concerns as we age. with 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day women's 50+. >>> among the wide range of topics covered in today's news conference was russia's recentl
mother black. they had to leave mississippi in the '60s to get married. >> how did it affect you, the idea that your parents' marriage was a crime? >> well, i think that it created in me a sense of psychological exile. >> and when she was 19, her mother was murdered by her former stepfather. >> that's the moment where i really tried in the language of poetry to make sense of that loss. >> here the dead stand up in stone. white marble on confederate avenue. i stand on ground once hallowed by a web of -- >> one of the themes of her work is memory. what gets left out of the nation's public record. she won a pulitzer prize in 2007 for native guard. about a forgotten black union regiment that fought in the civil war. >> we know it is our duty now to keep white men as prisoners. rebel soldiers. would-be masters. >> she wrote that poem in the library's reading room in seat 170. sometimes to rest her eyes, she would look up at a pillar marked poetry. >> now when i do it, i can't see the word poetry so clearly. but i have faith that it's there. >> so she will continue to cheer lead. for a
was assassinated in his own driveway in mississippi. we were a very different country. the original march on washington for jobs and freedom which took place august 28, 1963 was a call to action, not just to citizens of all colors who were concerned about civil rights but to politicians. in fact, the original march was mainly directed at little leaders in congress and in the white house to follow through on president kennedy's push for a civil rights bill which passed the following year. 50 years later, the supreme court's conservative majority including its lone black member have gutted the voting rights act passed two years after the march in 1965. states are rolling back access to health care for women and the working class. it's under constant attack. we are a different country but still have a fight 0 our hands. so when you watch the coverage commemorating the march remember the call to action is political because it always has been. thanks so much for watching. "hardball" with chris matthews is next. >>> hillary's ahead of schedule but who is driving the bus? let's play "hardball."
. but i wonder if an iconic white figure from south carolina or mississippi or alabama -- >> bill: but she comes out -- less than a month ago, right. she comes out and uses the "n" word and planning this birthday party for her brother and she's going to have -- this will be cute. we'll have it like a plantation birthday party and all of the waiters will be black waiters all dressed up and yes, sir, this and yes, sir, that. and is dropped by all of her sponsors. does she have anybody left? the book deal. she had a three-book deal. that was canceled. sponsors dropped her. she's in all of this trouble. yet she comes out, 73% positive compared to 59% among -- again, on republicans, in georgia. >> what i want to know is what's not to like about martin luther king? what's unfavorable about martin luther king? i can think of one thing that republicans in georgia find unfavorable. >> bill: i can, too. i guess maybe he doesn't make a mean enough peach pie. 1-866-55-press. let's talk about it here on the "full court press." >> announcer: get social with bill press. like us at facebook.com/billpresss
this morning. sarah thomas, a mother of three from mississippi, on track now to become the first permanent, female nfl official. she's on the field right now, in fact, with new orleans saints, as they go through training camp, honing skills as she awaits that final word that her dreams will finally come true. in those bold black and white stripes, and hair tucked under that black hat, this official looks exactly like every other one on the field. >> watch yourself right here, 17. little tight. little tight. >> reporter: but 39-year-old sarah thomas, a married mother of three, is on the verge of history. >> are you a tomboy? >> i'm a tomboy. yes, but i'm married with two boys. >> reporter: poised to become the first-ever full-time female official for the national football league. >> there's momma. >> 72, you have to come move up on this. put your guard up. >> individually, i'm a female. there's a lot of things that set us apart individually. race, gender. but collectively, we're out there for the same goal. >> reporter: for almost 16 years of officiating grade school, high school and colleg
watches and warnings up and down the mississippi river. they're getting better and subsiding. we're seeing this heavier rain off the coast of florida. while it's helping to fuel some thunderstorms the threat exactly from tropical depression dorian is becoming less of an issue as it will take this turn northeast. it will move out to sea north of bermuda. temperature wise 102 in dallas. 76 in chicago. tomorrow looks even cooler. temps in the new england area should only be in the mid-70s with late day thunderstorms. the showers that we're seeing in the northeast won't last all that much longer. we could squeeze out sunshine. most of next week temperatures look nice and comfortable. nothing too hot and nothing too cool in the northeast. >> that sounds like tend of a goldilocks story. >>> i talk to a leading crime fighter on the unintended consequences of stop and frisk policies. >>> the woman who accuses the san diego mayor of harassment. okay, a? b? b. a? that's a great choice. let me show you some faucets to go along with that. with the latest styles and guaranteed low prices, you can turn
at the forecast rainfall across the region, across the mississippi river valley and lower ohio valley we could see the potential for heavy rain, special across arkansas an in towards tennessee where we could see 6-12 inches in a very short period of time. still hot, still summertime across the southern plains. 98 in dallas, 98 in shreveport. 98 in houston, what it feels like, it's oppressive. 103 t in houston, 102 in san antonio. they are used this kind of weather. dallas, your forecast average right now is 97 degrees. another day of hundred degree heat and then we'll be slightly below average with some thunderstorms in the forecast. >> gregg: it's beautiful here in new york. it's unbelievable. it's in the 80s. >> spectacular with hardly any humidity. one of those days, we should have called in sick. >> gregg: it's jammed outside on sixth avenue. dominican day parade. great day for it. thanks very much. >> heather: in indonesia meantime, crews are searching for two children after a volcanic eruption, at least six people were killed when lava flowed into a village. the head of disaster agency they
.d. law, so ra mississippi, alabama so there is a signal to take on texas. arthel: thank you very much for that update. jon: turn to egypt where two top islamic groups are reportedly seeking a truce with egypt's military a. cording to the associateded press, the groups are willing to stop massive military tests in exchange to crackdown on muslim brotherhood supporters. joining us to talk about this and the larger issues, chris can and political activist who fled egypt in 2011. good to have you on. >> thank you for having me. jon: this request for a truce from the islamist groups, what do you make of that? >> if that's conditioned by the reinstallment of muhammad morsi, i do not think that this is ever going to happen and i do not think that it would be fair to refer to what these muslim brotherhood gatherings as protests. if we can say that the boston bomber was a protestor, there's much protestors as he was. jon: the coptic christians have bourne the brunt of the rage that's issued by many of the muslim brotherhood supporters. so many of the churches have been burned. what's behind th
, mississippi, marie, democratic caller in mississippi. the future of the democratic arty at this point, hiller -- hillary clinton is the sole standing. who she will take with her, that is questionable. she does not have much of a selection to choose from. after listening to her speech at the bar, it just reminded everyone how skilled she is. she is a lawyer. she understands constitutional law in this country as well as the national law. she's the best qualified in able to skills of being negotiate. it is the travesty of what happened in benghazi that i think it was very unprofessional and very undemocratic how the republican party tried to paint it is a very dangerous thing. some people do not want to have a military state in terms of how they run the embassies. it's very unfortunate that it but that is how the international goes. sabotaging the voting rights act, sabotaging the affordable health care act, making it look like something that it is when it isn't, everyone should be able to have health care. i don't know how many people can remember, but there was a time when you could not he den
, mississippi. >> caller: yes, sir. >> bill: how are you doing? what do you say? >> caller: i'm doing fine. thanks for taking my call, bill. on the smoker's issue, you know, i'm totally against people that are against people smoking. i smoked for 15 years, 1979, i quit for 30 years. and i just picked them back up about three years ago. and i never had an issue with people that smoked whenever i quit smoking. all of my friends smoked. most of them -- i'm just not against -- if people want to smoke, let them smoke. >> bill: i'm with you. here's the deal, why did you pick it up again? you know it's not good for you. >> there are a lot of things aren't good for me. i'm going to die of something some time. it is a freedom of ourselves to do what we want. >> bill: peter, you made that point earlier. living in this country, we are able to make some dumb decisions. >> i respect his decision to do something very dumb and i always hate to hear someone say well, you're going to die of something. yeah, you're going to die of something but if you decide you're going to decide to just all of a sudden st
in mississippi. an instructor and student made a jump saturday and disappeared. they were found hours later in a remote swamp. >>> a new picture of n.s.a. leaker edward snowden leaving russia. he was granted temporary asylum and is leaving with other ex-patriots. this while president obama says he will not meet with russian president putin for a one on one unless the situation changes. thoeup -- >>tucker: a scene out of a cops and robber movies. swat members stormed an animal shelter to shoot and kill gill -- giggles. >>steve: was it necessary to kill giggles or is this an example of excessive force in a government gone wild? ray shelby was taking care of giggles and witnessed the incident. he joins us live from chicago. good morning to you. >> good morning. >>steve: why did you have this white-tailed deer at the shelter? apparently you do need to have permits. otherwise it's illegal to keep him. >> a family from illinois brought the deer up because they were -- the deer had been in their backyard for like three days, and they didn't see the mother, so they knew we were there. the shelter i
direction. florida, georgia, michigan, mississippi. these are states that have been difficult to target. i think over time you want to see how the numbers do. the concern for some time is these children had about a five-time likelihood of growing up to be obese adults as well. the problem is coming. this is the first time we have seen sustained improvement. >> the states are all over the country. it's not concentrated in one region at all. is there a reason, a cause for h this drop at this point? >> we're not entirely sure. we asked the same question. >> of course. >> i would say this is the kitchen sink mentality. the obesity epidemic, throw everything at the problem to see what sticks. that was good probably. the hard part is trying to figure out what worked. one clue is ta the low income children being affected points to federal subsidy programs as a possible cause, a benefit. wic and food stamp programs have regulated what people can buy to eat. much more healthy buying going on. decrease ing sugary drinks. also breastfeeding. there is a sustained effort. it makes a difference. childre
appendectomy at a hospital in jackson, mississippi. the 71-year-old is expected to make a full recovery. >>anna: 32 minutes after the hour. how do you stop government leaks? get rid of the humans. a new dramatic step that is just being announced by the n.s.a. director at its cyber security conference. the plan, replace computer system administrators with machines. >> what we are in the process of doing, but not fast enough, is reducing our system administrators by about 90% for the first reason, which was to make our networks more defensible and more secure. >>anna: this plan was apparently already in place before the leaks but is now being sped up. >>peter: overnight a wild police chase ends with a suspect's car crashing and flipping over. take a look with us. >> you're going to have to make a turn here. look at this. off to the dirt and through the fence and rolling. >>peter: it happened in california. the man behind the wheel accused of carjacking that kia van. after about 20 minutes he finally got out of the car with a few bumps and bruises and then surrendered to police. any choice? i don'
, your thoughts on the president's remarks yesterday. west mississippi, independent line. caller: i completely agree with the president. mr. snowden is not a patriot. one of the most important thing is facing our country now is this whole issue of fiber security. fibrous security is more important to our nation than the budget deficit problem. it is more important than our dependence on foreign oil. we have to be more aggressive with our cyber security protection. when have to be more aggressive with regard to battling against these groups who want to break into our cyber systems that control everything from our financial markets to our power grids and everything else. houston,ther troy from texas. republican line. caller: thank you for taking my call. i think he is a patriot. the government cannot listen to every phone call and every conversation we have. that information is our private property. we should be able to sell it as we see fit. cyber security is no excuse for setting up being cut or a police state. this is a country and it seems like he is a patriot to me. host: suzanne
for a mississippi california girl, the latest on the man underhunt for the alleged abductor and suspected killer. >>> ex-humaning the truth, researchers will dig up secret graves at a florida reform school. what is behind the new efforts to uncover this school's deadly history? >>> also the american town where a 4-year-old, there is he, the 4-year-old who is now mayor again. you're watching msnbc. my mother made the best toffee in the world. it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. i never really thought i would make money doing what i love. [ robert ] we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. at truecar.com, we offer our users... guaranteed upfront savings. the result? truecar users save... over $3,000... on average. save time, save money, and never overpay. visit truecar.com if you've got it, you know how hard
office. the other is mississippi, which doesn't surprise you so much, but iowa? >> bill: that stuns me. there are so many great progressives there. >> and fabulous women leaders. i think 2016 is the year. >> bill: you mentioned senator claire mccal mccaskill. here she is from your forum. >> really hard choice as democrats last tight between two amazing candidates, and it was difficult. i'm optimistic that she'll be the candidate and we will be able to say madam presiden president 2016. >> bill: no doubt where she is. >> oh, no, not at all. >> bill: and she said she was with barack obama last time. and i think she felt guilty about it ever since. >> as she said, it was a tough choice last time. it's not a tough choice this time. one of the things that i'm excited to see inside the town hall, keep in mind this is august 2013. we're talking about a run three years from now. it was a packed room. there was overflow, spillover. and one of the things that was awesome to see was the iowa obama '08 people and the iowa '08 people all talking together and excited to be there and part of the same
in remote, western kentucky. it's right near the mississippi river in that little part of kentucky that abuts missouri and it's in a town of like 400 people and the candidates come and just the audience heckles them and things get thrown on the stage. i found a story from 1995 and two candidates from secretary of state in kk centucky. his father chants fbi, fbi during a speech. almost a fight, they had to hold him back. that's what's going on in coycoid tco kentucky today. i wonder, rick, we talk about mitch mcconnell last segment. what are kentucky voters going to be see from mitch mcconnell over the next year? >> people underestimate him because he has a soft kind of effect and this guy is not going to play a round and he's not going to take any -- there's not going to be any slack for either allison grimes or his republican opponent. this is a guy who goes for the throat and he's not going to screw around and i think you're going to see he has three things going for him. he has resources and he'll spend them, he'll spend them early, that works. an early understanding of the stat
, mike. >> fremont festival, biggest outdoor festival west of the mississippi. over here, biggest pain on the east bay area, the bay bridge toll plaza. the cash rains are all backed up, the fast track lanes, big advantage, get a fast track transresponder in the possibility of that strike on monday as well with b.a.r.t. shut down. look toward the eastshore freeway, traffic lighter, no problems on the berkeley curve, merge with folks off of 580, that you have slowing, the map shows the slow downs in the area, not so bad, ashby avenue the worst and 2r5d digsal any time of clay, you go, through downtown berkeley, nice smooth flow off the berkeley curve and take you to westbound highway 4, still slow in antioch and a crash that's clearing. back to you, janelle. >> thanks so much, mike. thanks for joining us. see you in a half an hour. ♪ >>> welcome back. >> what is that song? >> wow. >> you like it? >> yeah, sure. >> there's a best in the world. >> of course they are popular. but when you were a kid there were poppy bands that you listened to. >> that's true. >> new kids. >> new kids. >>
center. is a member of the mississippi bar. he was an executive vice president of energy and the youngest chairman of the federal energy regulatory commission to date. so with that said i would like to invite kurds and the entire panel to come up. -- kurt and the entire panel to come up. [inaudible conversations] good morning. great to be. i really want to thank the bipartisan policy center for putting this together. as you know, this is the cutting edge issue right now, and when it comes to risk and how we deal with going forward, mitigation of those risks has everything to do with our success. and yes, the industry is doing a lot. the industry has already done much to make certain that is too. one of the things i really find a little humorous, norman the industry goes last on these panels. your first here, and i think complexity, how is it -- how isn't listed here? what did i do with -- anyway, it has something to do with responding them and you get to respond first. so i think that's a great opportunity for you too sure exactly what's going on in industry, what yo you know, howu know i
: our guest has written a topic -- book on topic. the first call is bill from mississippi. republican line. go ahead, you are on with kevin of the boston globe. >> caller: good morning. my question is multifaceted. when they prosecuted al al capone he got eleven years. if they charged him with tax evasion. he's already 83. it would have given him -- he would have died in jail. it if the prosecutors opened the door to everything. absolutely everything. whitey because he wanted to defend his legacy as far as killing women and on and so forth. choose not to testify. it was going to be his last hooray. yet he choose not to do it. i don't understand why he didn't testify. >> guest: i think i do. i think he was afraid of being cross examined by the prosecutors. once he testifies he opens himself to everything. i'm the prosecutors i go to his teen days and ask about the sexual assault he was a charged with. he was not convicted. they could ask him about it. he portrays himself as a great patriot. he did three years in the air force. i would ask him to explain why he was charged with rape whe
of frank sinatra. ms. cel-- mississippi kelley's most recent book, "capturing camelot." very well photographed, obviously, and very well put together. personally, these picture books mean a lot more to me when the captions are well researched and thought out and a bit more prose than you would normally find which is what ms. kelley did with this book. never failing to raise a few eyebrows while uncovering stories and doing such a wonderfully painful job of reminding us our heroes are very, very human, please welcome to the festival kitty kelley. [applause] >> the only part of that introduction that isn't quite right is the prolific. it takes me four years -- >> i heard it from someone. >> no, you've got to be careful. [laughter] prolific as a turtle. it takes me four years usually on each book. but this one, this book was a labor of love because stanley tretick was one of my very best friends, and he was one of president kennedy's favorite photographers. and i used to go visit stanley in washington. and one time i asked him what he had in the marine corps locker that he used as hi
above mississippi. >>> and apple co-founder steve wozniak offering his review of "jobs" with ashton kutchers ahis former partner. steve likes ashton better in "that '70s show" let's just say. >>> futures lower after the longest losing streak since december for stocks. the dow down for four consecutive trading days losing 440 points. >>> the irs sent out letters to 20,000 small business owners over the past year notifying them of possible income underreporting. the irs thinks businesses that get most of their sales through credit cards may be underreporting their cash transactions. cnn money has a list of places where homes are the most affordable and your income goes the farthest. top, altemon springs, florida. >> we norman hat tan. we had red flag warnings in the area, talking about strong winds and dry lightning, eventually we'll get more moisture and see rain hit the ground and that will bring relief toward the second half of the week but it will take some time. >>> rain, way too much of it, in the southeast, one to two inches of rain still possible, three to four inches possible
of my favorite images of dr. king is from 1966 in mississippi when he is marching with stokely carmichael wright once told it was about to drop the phrase yellow, black power. dr. king because he was not jealous or insecure or disrespectful for younger people, we need to say that, even though he was a nobel peace prize winner, he had let the march on washington to get done all these incredible things. he listened to this younger rather than stokely carmichael explain why we should not call ourselves negroes anymore and embrace black power. dr. king felt like because he's a leader in the think it's important we define what a leader is. she or he because no more of the male stuff as i said, she or he changes the direction of the conversation, comes up with a nubile kegger. what did dr. king say? okay, i'm going to write an essay which anyone industry should read because you want to know what the blueprint is? it's called black power redefined by dr. king. part of the problem is we get so stuck in 1963, evolves and changes in again to put some teeth on his vision is our target ins
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